Pip and Posy: The Bedtime Frog

               Pip and Posy: The Bedtime Frog – Axel Scheffler,

                                           nosy crow, 2013.

 

Format: Hardback picture book

Rating: 4.5

What did you like about the book? Okay, I am an Axel Scheffler fan AND a Pip and Posy fan so what’s not to like!? When Posy goes to Pip’s house for a sleepover they have a wonderful time until they are tucked in bed and Posy discovers she has forgotten Froggy, her sleep-mate. Instead of going home or calling the parents, Pip shares his favorite softie and that does the trick! Very nice.

What didn’t you like about the book? N/A

To whom would you recommend this book? There are five other Pip and Posy adventures to share with the young!

Who should buy this book? Day-cares and public libraries

Where would you shelve it and why? Picture book

Should we (librarians) put this on the top of our “to read” piles? Not quite…..

Reviewer’s Name, Library (or school), City: Katrina Yurenka, Gardner High School

Date of review: 3/14/2014

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The Cat in the Hat knows a lot about that!: Night Lights

The Cat in the Hat knows a lot about that!: Night Lights –

                         Tish Rabe, Random House, 2012

 

Format: Paperback

Rating: 2

What did you like about the book? The story is based on the PBS television program as opposed to being a Dr. Seuss book so the illustrations are fashioned after Seuss’s. Here fireflies shine and glow and rescue a friend caught in a spider’s web.

What didn’t you like about the book? Not a whole lot.

To whom would you recommend this book? Eric Carle’s The Very Lonely Firefly is a much better book about fireflies.

Who should buy this book? Public libraries

Where would you shelve it and why? Picture books

Should we (librarians) put this on the top of our “to read” piles?   No.

Reviewer’s Name, Library (or school), City: Katrina Yurenka, Gardner High School

Date of review: 3/14/2014

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How to be a Pirate by Sue Fliess

How to be a Pirate – Sue Fliess, Illustrated by Nikki Dyson,

                   Little Golden Book, 2014.

 

Format: Little Golden book size

Rating: 3

What did you like about the book? The story does what the title promises: gives you the information on how to become a pirate: the clothes, the parrot, the ship and the skull and crossbones flag. Sure to appeal to would-be-pirates out there!

What didn’t you like about the book? N/A

To whom would you recommend this book?  Pirates! by Viviana Garofoli is a fun pirate book for the same age group.

Who should buy this book? Public libraries and day-cares

Where would you shelve it and why? Picture books

Should we (librarians) put this on the top of our “to read” piles? No.

Reviewer’s Name, Library (or school), City: Katrina Yurenka, Gardner High School

Date of review: 3/14/2014

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Bears in Beds by Shirley Parenteau

Bears in Beds – Shirley Parenteau, Illustrated by David

                     Walker, Candlewick, 2014.

 

Format: Board Book

Rating: 3.5

What did you like about the book? Another charming bear book by Parenteau and Walker, though not quite up to the magic of Bears on Chairs. The five bears are tucked in bed when a loud wind frightens the Big Brown Bear. The four little ones soothe him by climbing into his bed.

What didn’t you like about the book? N/A

To whom would you recommend this book?  Parenteau and Walker’s previous book, Bears on Chairs, visits the same bears in a similar experience.

Who should buy this book? Public libraries and day-cares

Where would you shelve it and why? Board Books

Should we (librarians) put this on the top of our “to read” piles? No.

Reviewer’s Name, Library (or school), City: Katrina Yurenka, Gardner High School

Date of review: 3/14/2014

 

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Ten Eggs in a Nest by Marilyn Sadler

Ten Eggs in a Nest, Marilyn Sadler, Beginner Books, 2014

 

Format:  Easy Reader

 

Rating: 1-5 (5 is excellent or a Starred review) 4

 

Genre:  Easy Reader

 

What did you like about the book?This is a cute early reader that has simple words, great repetition and includes some math and counting. Red Rooster is awaiting his baby chicks and when Gwen the hen finally hatches one, he rushes off to buy a worm for his new baby. When he returns there are more chicks, so back he goes. The number words are in all capitals which make them stand out. Also, each time Red returns the reader gets a chance to try to math on their own before getting the answer on the next page: “But when Red got home, Gwen had a surprise for him! TWO more baby chicks had hatched.” The text on the next page: “ONE plus TWO makes THREE baby chicks!”

The bright and simple illustrations by Michael Fleming add to the charm.

 

What didn’t you like about the book?Nothing

 

To whom would you recommend this book?  (Read-alikes if you can think of them) This is a great book for both children learning to read and to count.

 

Who should buy this book? (Middle schools, high schools, small libraries, all libraries, etc.) Lower elementary schools and public libraries

 

Where would you shelve it and why?Early readers

 

Should we (librarians) put this on the top of our “to read” piles? Not particularly

 

Reviewer’s Name, Library (or school), City: Catherine Coyne, Mansfield Public Library

 

Date of review: 2/25/14

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Hearts: a toon book by Thereza Row

Hearts: a toon book,Thereza Rowe, Candlewick Press, 2014

 

Format:  Easy Reader /Graphic novel

 

Rating: 1-5 (5 is excellent or a Starred review) 2

 

Genre:  Fantasy

 

What did you like about the book?The storyline is beautiful – a young fox holds a broken heart when she says goodbye to her astronaut best friend. She accidentally drops the heart into the ocean and then begins a journey to find it. A chicken finally retrieves the heart for fox, but then is menaced by a pointy toothed creature. Fox sacrifices the broken heart to save chicken and is rewarded when chicken hatches an unbroken heart from an egg. The illustrations tell the story with very little text.

 

What didn’t you like about the book? I feel that the concept of the story is not appropriate for the intended audience. Most early readers would have difficulty making sense of the story and the paucity of text detracts from its use as and early reader.

 

To whom would you recommend this book?  (Read-alikes if you can think of them) This might be a nice gift for your best friend for teens or adults.

 

Who should buy this book? (Middle schools, high schools, small libraries, all libraries, etc.) None

 

Where would you shelve it and why?If I had to shelf it, I would probably put it with graphic novels or picture books. Definitely not with easy readers.

 

Should we (librarians) put this on the top of our “to read” piles?No

 

Reviewer’s Name, Library (or school), City: Catherine Coyne, Mansfield Public Library

 

Date of review:2/25/14

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Winter Sky by Patricia Reilly Giff

Winter Sky – Patricia Reilly Giff, Wendy Lamb Books, 2014.

 

Format: Hardback

Rating: 4

Genre:  Contemporary fiction

What did you like about the book? Eleven-year-old Siria’s father is a firefighter. Her mother is dead. She lives in constant fear that she may lose her father as well. She goes out at night, tracking fires to make sure her father is safe. Her mother has left her a narrative journal which guides her along with the many of the inhabitants of her apartment building.

What didn’t you like about the book? N/A

To whom would you recommend this book?  Try The View from Saturday by E.L. Konigsburg.

Who should buy this book? Public libraries, Middle and elementary schools

Where would you shelve it and why? Fiction.

Should we (librarians) put this on the top of our “to read” piles? Not quite.

Reviewer’s Name, Library (or school), City: Katrina Yurenka, Gardner High School

Date of review: March 4, 2014

Posted in Elementary, Wendy Lamb | Leave a comment